Taxonomy Bootcamp 2009… A regular smorgasboard

Looking for a good way to spend a week in the California sun and learn more about taxonomy, search and knowledge management? Look no further than the triple-slam event of the fall conference season:

Taxonomy Bootcamp / KM World / Enterprise Search Summit West
Register today with our discount code to save 200$!

Mark your calendars, cause we have a full slate of taxonomy-related presentations this year, including:

Workshop: Taxonomy Implementation & Integration (Seth Earley & Stephanie Lemieux)
Date: November 16, 2009 – 9:00 – 12:00
Come hear Seth & I talk about how some of the companies we’ve worked with have been able to implement their taxonomies and integrate them with WCM, ECM and digital asset management systems among others. Hear about practical applications of taxonomy within different classes of tools as well as technical integration challenges (hierarchy challenges, build-vs-buy issues, etc.).

Workshop: SharePoint Information Architecture: Integrating Taxonomy & Metadata (Stephanie Lemieux & Shawn Shell)
Date: November 16, 2009 – 1:30 – 4:30
My friend Shawn Shell and I will cover the ups and downs of trying to build taxonomy and metadata frameworks in SharePoint – a tool with a distinct handicap when it comes to hierarchical metadata and search relevancy. We’ll talk about 3rd party add-ons that can help with tagging, taxonomy and faceted search.

Session: SharePoint Information Architecture: Integrating Taxonomy & Metadata (Jeff Carr & Stephanie Lemieux)
Date: November 19, 2009 – 1:15 – 2:00
If you can’t make it for the workshop, don’t miss this condensed version giving highlights on how to achieve taxonomy in SharePoint. We’ll cover a couple of case studies here as well, and give a quick overview of add-ons.

Session: Best Bet ROIs: We’ve Seen It All (Panel) (Seth Earley)
Date: November 19, 2009 – 3:30 – 4:15 EST
This panel of content management problem-solvers shares their experiences and perspectives of successfully determining the return on investment for folksonomy, taxonomy, and ontology initiatives

Session: Increasing Traffic by Integrating Taxonomy & SEO (Panel) (Jeff Carr)
Date: November 19, 2009 – 3:15 – 4:00 EST
Jeff is taking part in a fun panel format where speakers get just a few slides and a few minutes to make their point… Hear about how taxonomy is an important factor in many SEO ranking signals.

And if you’re not in info overload yet…

Session: Folksonomies: Beyond the Folks Tales (Panel) (Stephanie Lemieux)
Date: November 20, 2009 – 10:40 – 11:15
Join me for a panel that promises to be fun and informative, where Tom Reamy (KAPS) and I will go head to head on the merits and applications of Folksonomies.

This year promises to be a great show – join us in San Jose this November to chat about all things taxonomy, folksonomy, ontology, and any other “onomy” or “ology” you care to bring to the table. Use this link for a 200$ discount.

Special shout out to the TaxoCoP members – we’ll be sure to organize a get together for those of you who’ll be onsite.

SEO vs. TNBP or “Where was I going again?”

Much has been written on this blog about the value of SEO when it comes to taxonomies.  As Stephanie mentions its’ a huge weapon in the battle against outdated legacy terminology and spur of the second marketing speak. Jeff’s posts on keyword research, taxonomy and SEO are indispensable primers on the topic. So what haven’t we talked about yet?

How about SEO as the enemy of navigation?

Is there such a problem as too much of a good thing? When it comes to taxonomy navigation best practices and SEO, you bet.  Think about it this way: imagine you are meeting a friend for drinks after work and she tells you a story about something that happened to her during the day.

“I was in my office, and I had just poured myself a fresh cup of coffee.  I was in my office and the phone rang but I was tempted to ignore it. I was in my office and picked up the phone and it was my husband calling, did I mention I was in my office? Anyways I was in my office and my husband told me to sit down because he had incredible news. I was in my office and I sat down. I was in my office and my husband told me that we had just won the lottery?

Right, so… where were you again?  In your office, ok we get it!

Now have a look at the following taxonomy navigation suggested to us on a project for SEO purposes: Continue reading

Taxonomy & SEO – Integrating Perspectives

My last few blog posts on keyword research tips have generated interest from our readers regarding the relationship between the SEO task of keyword research and taxonomy. The purpose of today’s post is to examine the intersection between the two and offer a little advice for reconciling the internal perspective of taxonomy with external internet search.

We can harmonize these perspectives using a data-driven approach to understand the “mental model” of the external searcher.

Taxonomies Drive Information Organization

The purpose of a taxonomy is to define consistent organizing principles for information based on language people use to achieve their goals. (Whether finding a product, executing a task, solving a problem, etc)

Taxonomy terms can standard industry vocabularies, language unique to the organization or even general marketing speak.

Regardless of the context, taxonomies define the preferred terminology along with its synonyms, word stems, variants and relationships to other concepts. These classification schemes are intended to help users locate specifc documents and content as they go about their business.

Continue reading

Tips for Conducting Keyword Research – Part 2

In my last post I discussed a process for putting together a broad list of keywords intended to act as the starting point for our keyword research. The purpose of this step was to give us the ability to cast as wide a net as possible in an effort to uncover as much of the language being used by our potential customers when searching for our content, products and/or services online. Doing so not only gives us the opportunity to wisely target the correct keywords, but also lets us craft our content in such a way as to tap into as much into the long tail as possible.

To illustrate, I’ll use the following Top Content report from Google Analytics. As you can see this particular page, although targeted toward a specific set of keywords, generated traffic from an amazing 5,766 unique keyword combinations! This alone demonstrates the power of the long tail in driving significant amounts of traffic to your website.

Google Analytics Top Content Report

Google Analytics Top Content Report

Keep in mind that you don’t want to generate traffic just for traffic’s sake; you want these visitors to do something while on the site, whether it’s to buy your product, fill out a form or contact your company. Web analytics aside, now that we’ve done all the groundwork and assembled our master list of terms, we’re ready to tackle the research part of our keyword research. Continue reading

Tips for Conducting Keyword Research – Part 1

Last week Stephanie wrote about (post) the importance of considering specific facets of search engine optimization in helping taxonomists guide clients in choosing the right keywords. To further that discussion, I thought I’d put together a series of posts to speak in more detail about using keyword research as a tool for determining (or at least being consciously aware of) the language being used by those searching for your content, products and/or services online.

Preparation – Creating Your Master List
The first step in the process is the groundwork. I always allocate a certain amount of time up front to plan and prepare the list of initial keywords to be used as a basis for conducting keyword research. You need to have an inventory of words or phrases to get started, so why not put some thought and effort into generating a solid list to work from. From my perspective, the better the plan, the better the results. So let’s get to it.
Continue reading

SEO – Helping taxonomists fight the good fight

In my last post, I mentioned the difficulty that some clients/stakeholders have in letting go of certain terminology when they undertake a taxonomy project:

Search engine optimization (SEO) has become one of the most important tools in helping us taxonomists get hard data that is meaningful and fight against the inclusion of terms that are too cute, ambiguous or otherwise detract from the findability of content.

Continue reading